The Body in Medical Thought and Practice

The Body in Medical Thought and Practice (Philosophy and Medicine)
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The gods of the Egyptians did not live in the far-off heavens - although they certainly occupied that space as well - but on the earth, in the river, in the trees, down the road, in the temple in the city 's center, at the horizon, noon, sunset, through life and on into death. When one considers the close relationship the ancient Egyptians had with their gods it is hardly surprising to find supernatural elements in their most common medical practices. Editorial Review This Article has been reviewed for accuracy, reliability and adherence to academic standards prior to publication.

We're a small non-profit organisation run by a handful of volunteers. Become a Member. Mark, J. Ancient History Encyclopedia. Mark, Joshua J. Last modified February 16, Ancient History Encyclopedia, 16 Feb Submitted by Joshua J. This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon this content non-commercially, as long as they credit the author and license their new creations under the identical terms.

Please note that content linked from this page may have different licensing terms. Mark published on 16 February Remove Ads Advertisement. The Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt. Gramercy Books, David, R. Religion and Magic in Ancient Egypt. Penguin Books, Lewis, J.

Running Press, Shaw, I. The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt. Oxford University Press, Strudwick, H. Metro Books, About the Author Joshua J. Mark has lived in Greece and Germany and traveled through Egypt. He has taught history, writing, literature, and philosophy at the college level. Related Content Filters: All. Sushruta c.

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The gods and goddesses of Ancient Egypt were an integral part of Medical practice in ancient Egypt was so advanced that many of Medicine in ancient Egypt was understood as a combination of practical Roman medicine was greatly influenced by earlier Greek medical The popular view of life in ancient Egypt is often that it was Help us write more We're a small non-profit organisation run by a handful of volunteers. The Complete Far Side: Andrews McMeel Publishing 01 October Hill and Wang 16 January In cooking it is critical to recognize that human beings have a nature distinct from animals.

For instance, humans are less capable of digesting raw meats. Thus, allowances must be made in the preparation and cooking of meat that best suit the human metabolism 3. The most common element between cooking and medicine is the mixing and blending of foods. Medicine, however, requires a greater discrimination between food types and classes of individuals so that correct nutritional needs may be identified and prescribed 5.

The practitioner in the end acquires mastery of preparing foods and the ability to identify the class of individuals to whom the food is administered. In this regard, cooking and medicine are the same chaps. His goal is to explore the potential consequences of the principle in question. The proponents of cure by contraries assume that all diseases have their roots in the humors hot, cold, wet, dry, and that the cure for each disease is the opposite of the cause. The author imagines a situation where a person changes his food from cooked to raw and as a result becomes ill. Hot therefore would cure cold, and dry would be the cure for wet.

The author sees this as an oversimplification. He argues that cooking is a process in which the original raw food losses some of its qualities and gains others by mixing and blending Human beings are affected by the food they consume because every food has its own innate virtues. It is important for the physician to identify these virtues The attainment of such knowledge demands a clear understanding of human nature. The human being, explains the author, contains a blend of many humors. When the humors are balanced or properly mixed the human being is healthy, but when they are unbalanced or improperly mixed and one is more concentrated than the other, pain and disease is the result In chapter 15 the author argues that whereas the proponents of humoral medicine see food purely as hot, cold, wet, or dry, human beings also possess a quality such as sweet or bitter.

These qualities are the ones that cause serious harm to the body.

The Body in Medical Thought and Practice

In Chapter 16, the author presents a number of examples from common experience. For instance, in a fever hot and cold humors counteract each other in the body without the need of medical aid. As he points out in chapter 17, however, in some cases the fever persists.

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In the second half of the 20th century, the body has become a central theme of intellectual debate. How should we perceive the human body? Is it best. This is the first volume to systematically explore the range of contemporary thought concerning the body and draw out its crucial implications for.

This is an indication that hot is not the sole cause of the fever. There must be some other inherent factor responsible for sustaining the fever. In chapters 18 and 19, he continues to develop the idea that recovery from disease comes about when there is a blending and coction of the humors. Coction is the act or process of attaining a more perfect or more desirable condition. Just as the cook brings about coction in food external to the human organism; the physician brings about coction of the bodily humors.

In chapter 20 the author dismisses the theories of human nature associated with Empedocles and the pre-Socratic inquiry as irrelevant to medical practices.

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He argues that their theories lean towards philosophy and have more to do with the art of writing than with medicine. The author believes that the theory of human nature must be based on medicine, through the observation of the human organism within nature. He takes exception to thinkers such as Empedocles who attempted to provide such an understanding through his cosmological theories. Practically speaking, for medicine to be effective the physician needs to know the true nature of man and this must be determined through his relationship to food, drink, and other practices associated with the human organism Therefore, the physician must understand the constituency of food and its effects on the body of the patient he is treating.

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Chapters the author extends the nature theory to include bodily structures. He also expands his theory of knowledge by advocating the use of analogies to attain an understanding of that which cannot be observed directly within the human organism. The greater the general and specific knowledge attained by the physician, the more accurate his diagnostic and therapeutic skills to include preparation and administration of prescriptions or remedies.

Body image. Medicine Philosophy Summary In the second half of the 20th century, the body has become a central theme of intellectual debate. How should we perceive the human body? Is it best understood biologically, experientially, culturally?

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How do social institutions exercise power over the body and determine norms of health and behavior? The answers arrived at by phenomenologists, social theorists, and feminists have radically challenged our cenventional notions of the body dating back to 17th century Cartesian thought. This is the first volume to systematically explore the range of contemporary thought concerning the body and draw out its crucial implications for medicine. Its authors suggest that many of the problems often found in modern medicine -- dehumanized treatment, overspecialization, neglect of the mind's healing resources -- are directly traceable to medicine's outmoded concepts of the body.

New and exciting alternatives are proposed by some of the foremost physicians and philosophers working in the medical humanities today. Contents Machine derived contents note: Introduction. Section 1: Theoretical Overviews. Phenomenological Critiques. Why aren't More Doctors Phenomenologists?

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Sociopolitical Critiques. Cultural and Historical Perspectives. Section 2: Regional Studies. Specific Diseases. Northoff, M. Schwartz, O. Coda: The Body of the Future. The Body of the Future; E. Notes Also available in print. Electronic reproduction.

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Would you like us to take another look at this review? Cancel Submit. Email address. New and exciting alternatives are proposed by some of the foremost physicians and philosophers working in the medical humanities today. Ta kontakt med Kundesenteret. Science, Technology, and the Art of Medicine. Ta kontakt med Kundesenteret.

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